A few quick notes on the Snyder cut of Justice League.

Warning: Spoilers.

First, there is no doubt Snyder’s version is better. I actually cared about Cyborg and Aquaman as characters this time around. And the Flash’s whole arc is much better. Even Batman and Wonder Woman seems far more fleshed out this time around.

One thing I really liked about the Whedon version was its treatment of Superman. Superman is a superhero among superheroes and past movies (made by Snyder!) didn’t treat him this way. Yet Snyder’s treatment of Superman was just as good as Whedon’s in its own…


This is a review of Disney’s new WandaVision show and it contains some spoilers.

WandaVision surprised me as to how clever it was. It accomplished something I’m not sure I’ve ever seen done before: it succeeded at 3 layers of storytelling simultaneously, with each level enhancing the other levels.

Level 1: As a spoof of a 50s sitcom

The show immediately reminds you of I Dream of Jeannie and Bewitched and there are many intentional nods to shows from this era. There is marvelous (pardon the pun) humor gently poking fun at the old shows we grew up on. …


I’m carrying on a Twitter conversation with multiple Popperians about the difference between “Creativity” and “Universal Explainers.” Unfortunately, due to the limitations of Twitter, the conversation is hard to follow, so I’m writing it up here so that it’s more clear.

First, KS and I were discussing if Creativity required Universality or not. He was arguing Creativity required Universality and I was arguing that it did not if by “creativity” you mean “knowledge creation.”

As with a lot of conversations where you are thinking on your feet, it’s easy to talk past each other and I believe that was what…


This post is the second part of a three part series on Trump and the Mueller report. The first post was an abridged version of the Mueller report (called “The Muller Report Distilled” or MRD for short) that took less than 30 minutes to read. It was not a summary, but instead I took the most relevant parts of the actual report and strung them together into a much shortened version.

This post is my best effort to represent the other side of the argument. I did my best to find and collect the best information I can that wasn’t…


No time to read the 448 pages of the Mueller report to find out what it really says? This post is for you because it boils down the main narrative of the Mueller report to a 30 minute read (about 13 or so pages.) If you don’t even have that much time, try just reading the headers I give — jumping into the details only if interested.

I extracted out of the Mueller reports the parts of the narrative that jumped out as me the most and seemed the most relevant. To keep the length down, obviously I was forced…


The following is a response to Kieren’s claim that Deutsch’s Hard to Vary (HTV) criteria is really just Induction in disguise. (his original post) I made a short response to him pointing out that in reality we do not look for good theories via only constraint of past observations but instead by how well it’s constrained against other theories. Kieren responded back to me making the following arguments (Twitter link):

  1. “…these other theories are themselves constrained by observations.”
  2. “Any theory that says something new about the world… [makes claims that must either be] explained by other theories… [or were] accepted…


On Twitter “Kieren” has written a short paper where he argues that David Deutsch’s “Hard to Vary” (HTV) criteria for good explanations are really sneaking Induction in via the back door. This article is my attempt to give a short response to Kieren’s argument:

Being unable to vary something implies a constraint. So what is it that constrains a scientific theory? I will demonstrate that the constraint is empirical evidence, or past observations. We can only vary a theory so much before it becomes inconsistent with the evidence at hand (past observations). …


I am a huge fan of David Deutsch’s writings. I loved both The Fabric of Reality and The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations that Transform the World. In fact, I loved them so much I took his bibliography and the back of each book (particularly the “Everyone Should Ready These” section) and started reading them. Deutsch’s worldview is so optimistic, it’s hard not to love it. I want to feel I can agree with Deutsch entirely, but felt I couldn’t without first seeking out the very best criticisms of his views.

So I sought out criticisms of Deutsch, starting with Roger…


Rationally speaking, it’s easier to frame a question well than to resolve the question. But all too often even framing the question well never really happens. In this post I’m going to frame the question of equality of outcome vs opportunity for women in the work place, using the now famous Jordan Peterson vs Cathy Newman interview as my backdrop.

In Cathy Newman’s interview with Jordan Peterson she used the fact that there are only 7 women running the top FTSE 100 companies as support for the idea that women are still being dominated and excluded by men. To her…


My favorite authors (David Deutsch, Roger Penrose, and Douglas Hofstadter) all delve into the Church-Turing Thesis of Computational Theory and, more importantly, its strongest interpretation: The Turing Principle. [1] In this post I will first explain the Church-Turing Thesis in layman’s terms.

Back when I was working on my computer science degree I studied Turing machines and the Church-Turing Thesis in my Intro to Computational Theory class. Back then I thought it was a big waste of time. …

Bruce Nielson

Bruce is a Master's student specializing in Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

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